Sinus Lift…Really?

Posted on by Dr. Robert Axelrad (Brampton Dentist)

Who would think that you could lift anything other than a face? But really, there is a procedure in dentistry known as a sinus lift. Here’s how it works, but first a simple lesson in dental anatomy.

Sinusitis

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The upper teeth are located in what is known as the ‘Maxillary Jaw’. Below the cheeks and above the roots of the teeth, there are empty spaces known as the sinuses.   They extend from the front of the ‘maxillary jaw’ to the back of it.

 

The upper back teeth (or molars) often have roots which may enter in to the sinuses. In the last entry, we saw how a sinus infection (Sinusitis) can cause your teeth to ache.

A sinus lift is a procedure that is done when an implant needs to be placed in the upper back area of the mouth, and there is not enough bone to place it. The actual procedure of doing a sinus lift is pretty easy. It’s the simple action of ‘tapping’ the sinus upwards, because it has come down.  We have to lift ‘it’ up, because we need to replace the bone which has been lost so that the implant has something to be anchored in to.

Why did the sinus ‘fall’ in the first place?
The reason for the bone loss and the sinus falling is most often because a tooth is removed and not replaced immediately with an implant. After a tooth is removed, the bone that was present and holding the tooth in shrinks. It’s a little bit complicated, but basically, if an upper back tooth is removed, it should be replaced with an implant right away to preserve the bone and prevent the sinus from dropping. The bone stays ‘healthy’ if it is loaded with a force; if not, it shrinks.

As a matter of fact, this goes for any tooth that is removed: it should be replaced with an implant right away, so you don’t lose the bone that is needed to ultimately anchor it in…pay it forward!

If you are experiencing headaches, facial pain or pressure of a dull, constant, or aching sort, you may be suffering from sinusitis.  If you recognize any of the symptoms mentioned above, please do not hesitate to contact us at 905-791-3867 or email us at robertaxelrad@rogers.com. We can help!

Dr. Robert Axelrad, Your Local Brampton Dentist

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