Dr. Robert Axelrad Dental Office

Making Brampton Smile Since 1997

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Dental Case Study

Let’s give credit where credit is due…

In many instances the dentist needs to work with a dental laboratory in order to complete a patient’s case. In this blog, we will look at a case that I recently completed. It will accomplish two objectives:

1) Show you how an edentulous (absence of teeth) area in the mouth can be rehabilitated with dental implants. To see what choices there are to fill a gap in the mouth, please read the blog “Options to replace a missing tooth,” posted on October 2nd, 2011.

2) Demonstrate that the process of making an implant (crown and denture too) not only involves the dentist, but also the dental laboratory.

Dental Case Study

This is an individual who was missing two posterior (back) teeth in their lower right jaw area. The back molar teeth are important as they are needed to chew with.

Image one:

The two silver circular areas resting on the gingiva (gums) are called ‘Healing Caps.’ Underneath them are the actual dental implants. They were placed in the jaw bone approximately six months ago and left to rest there in a dormant state. The implants are made of titanium and this material forms an irreversible bond with the bone. They replace the actual roots of the teeth.

The two silver circular areas resting on the gingiva (gums) are called ‘Healing Caps.’ Underneath them are the actual dental implants. They were placed in the jaw bone approximately six months ago and left to rest there in a dormant state. The implants are made of titanium and this material forms an irreversible bond with the bone. They replace the actual roots of the teeth.

The silver, circular areas are known as ‘Healing Caps. They cover the dental implants which were placed into the jaw bone about six months previously. The implants are made up of titanium. Titanium forms an irreversible bond with the bone.  Implants act to replace the roots of the teeth. For a better understanding of dental implants, please see the blog “Dental Implants …. A great solution for a missing tooth,” posted on October 9th, 2011.

Image two:

This is an image that I felt needed to be included because it gives some recognition to the dental laboratory. The triangular pewter looking objects will attach to the implants and support the future crown. Note When a crown, denture or bridge is fabricated, it is the lab that actually makes the final product that is inserted into the patient’s mouth……It’s not just the dentist, but rather the lab and the dentist who work together as a team to make the whole process work.

This is an image that I felt needed to be included because it gives some recognition to the dental laboratory. The triangular pewter looking objects will attach to the implants and support the future crown.
Note When a crown, denture or bridge is fabricated, it is the lab that actually makes the final product that is inserted into the patient’s mouth……It’s not just the dentist, but rather the lab and the dentist who work together as a team to make the whole process work.

The two pewter triangular structures that you see on the stone models were fabricated by the dental lab. They are known as implant abutments.

Image three:

The triangular pewter looking objects are called Abutments. They are transferred over and screwed onto the implants (in the patient’s mouth) underneath the healing caps.

The triangular pewter looking objects are called Abutments. They are transferred over and screwed onto the implants (in the patient’s mouth) underneath the healing caps.

After approximately six months the healing caps (image one) are removed and the abutments (image two) are screwed onto the implants which have integrated into the bone.

Image four:

The crowns, also fabricated by the dental lab, are then cemented on the abutments. This is known as a team approach.

The crowns, also fabricated by the dental lab, are then cemented on the abutments.
This is known as a team approach.

The crowns (also known as caps), which are also made by the dental lab are then cemented onto the abutments.

As one can see, this whole process is clearly a team approach.

Yours in good dental health,

Dr. Robert Axelrad, Brampton Dentist